PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE RESIDENTS OF ANNAPOLIS COUNTY

Waste Collection in Annapolis County

Please be advised that waste collection services will continue to be picked up on the same day and bi-weekly schedule. 
THIS WILL NOT CHANGE.

Garbage rules will remain the same (Blue Bag 1 – Paper & Paper products; Blue Bag 2 – Recyclables, cans, plastics, cartons, foam polystyrene products; 3 Clear Bags & 1 Black bag – all other garbage)

Compost will need to be placed in a biodegradable compost bag and placed curbside on the day of your scheduled garbage pick-up. 
PLEASE DO NOT USE THE GREEN COMPOST CARTS AFTER AUGUST 17TH.

The County of Annapolis is providing biodegradable compost bags for residents who wish to pick up from one of the county offices:

396 Main Street, Lawrencetown
271 Granville Street, Bridgetown
752 Saint George Street, Annapolis Royal.

The County of Annapolis has contracted the services of EFR Environmental to ensure the County residents continue to receive the same valued service as in the past.

Your support for your fellow residents during this transition is greatly appreciated.

For regular updates please use one of the following:

Phone:                1-833-360-2454
Email:                   waste@annapoliscounty.ca
Website:              www.AnnapolisCounty.ca


Compost: A Message For Annapolis County Residents


Open Letter to Residents

Read Commonly Asked Question "What About My Waste"  Click Here


Our new “Waste Hotline” is now active 1-833-360-2454,
as well as the new dedicated email waste@annapoliscounty.ca

All inquiries regarding waste matters may now be referred to this phone or email

Notice

Please be advised, the waste hotline (1-833-360-2454) is presently experiencing a very high volume of calls. If your call is not being answered and/or you are unable to leave a message please try again later or email your inquiry to waste@annapoliscounty.ca. We are working diligently to answer and return all calls in a timely manner. Your patience is appreciated.

 

Calls will be answered between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm. However, you are welcome to call the hotline after hours and leave a message. Your call will be returned as quickly as possible.

 

Again, we thank you for your patience and understanding.

Canoe Annapolis County Route 27 - Tobeatic Wilderness Area

Route 27 - Tobeatic Wilderness Area

The Tobeatic Wilderness Area is the jewel in the crown of Nova Scotia's 31 wilderness areas. The
Tobeatic, at over 100,000 hectares (250,000 acres) in size, is by far the largest, most remote and essentially
roadless true wilderness left in Nova Scotia, and includes the Shelburne Heritage River within its boundaries.
The Tobeatic remains wild, with no facilities, but is crisscrossed by a series of navigable waterways and
carries, used by the Mi'kmaq for millennia and informally maintained by paddlers.

It is possible to paddle in the Tobeatic on short trips of a day or two, or take much longer trips of up to
two weeks. There is a cabin available for use in foul weather at Sand Beach Lake on the Shelburne River, but
be prepared to tent otherwise. Paddlers are encouraged to follow No Trace Camping principles, and to file a
trip plan with your local Department of Natural Resources or Department of Environment and Labour
Protected Areas Division, and with family or friends. It should be emphasized that the Tobeatic is a very large
area with large lakes and challenging rivers, without amenities and facilities, so therefore careful planning and
close attention to weather and water conditions is required.

The Tobeatic offers a wealth of back country paddling opportunities - so many as to be beyond the
scope of this guide. At the time of this printing, no formal and detailed mapping of Tobeatic canoe routes
exists. Information on particular routes may be obtained through the Nova Scotia Department of Environment
and Labour, Protected Areas Division, local paddling clubs and individuals.

The accompanying map shows the network of forestry and public roads (in yellow) surrounding the
Tobeatic Wilderness Area and Kejimkujik National Park. The roadless nature of these protected areas is
evident, and illustrates their importance in providing a natural and undisturbed ecosystem.

The map shows the traditional and popular access points for the Tobeatic. Refer to the appropriate
1:50 000 series mapping for details.

Click here for a map and more details about this route.
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